Ferrari F50 for sale low milage as new

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Overview

  • 1997
  • Year Built

Description

Best deal on  a F50 usd1.475m  less than 10.000km need new fuel cells otherwise perfect with Ferrari Classiche certificate! Model photos

Like the F1 car it was derived from, the F50 used proper inboard coil springs operated by puslirods and rocker arms, although, to make room for two people’s feet, the front-end spring/damper units were transverse rather than longitudinal. With titanium uprights and magnesium wheels, not to mention all-metal ball joints, it was no wonder the F50 steered with such precision. The F50 was to be much rarer than Ferrari’s previous flagship hyper car, the F40: the company decreed that only 349 would be built, compared with 1311 F40s
Ferrari F50 Ferrari F50
Car review on FERRARI F50

When the time came for Ferrari engineers to build a new flagship in the mid-1990s, the brief was simple and uncompromising: take our 1990 Formula 1 racer (the 641/2) and transform it into a street-legal 200 mph (322kph) road car. Enter, in March 1995, the F50, the spiritual successor to the F40 and certainly the most potent road car yet made by Ferrari.

Clothed in a flat-bottomed Pininfarina body that recalled Ferrari’s sports racers of the early 70s, it was easily the wildest road car Ferrari had ever built. With such headline-making performance figures, pundits made immediate comparisons with McLaren’s stunning Fl. It was understandable but in reality these were two very different cars: where the F1’s designers pursued refinement and build quality as well as ultimate performance, the F50 – a shade slower than the bigger-engine and lighter McLaren – was more of a raw sports car created to give its owner Formula 1 sensations on the road.

The F50 nevertheless proved a surprisingly easy car to drive with a superb six-speed gearbox, reasonable ride (despite the rock-hard computerized damping and massive 335/30 ZR 18 tires) and a user-friendly engine. Then there was the small matter of price: at £330,000 ($555,000) the F50 was hardly cheap but still about half the cost of the British McLaren.

Boasting 521 bhp from its Formula 1-derived five-valves-per-cylinder V-twelve engine, the F50 could do 64 mph (103 kph) in first, 112 mph (180 kph) in second, 124 mph (194 kph) in third, 138mpli (222 kph) in fourth, 160 mph (275 kph) in fifth and 202 mph (325 kph) in sixth. The handling was more forgiving than the F40 despite the extra speed, with superb non-assisted steering giving little kick-back but masterly precision.

Price:
Year: 1997
HP: 521
KMH: Best deal on  a F50 usd1.475m  less than 10.000km need new fuel cells otherwise perfect with Ferrari Classiche certificate! Model photos

Like the F1 car it was derived from, the F50 used proper inboard coil springs operated by puslirods and rocker arms, although, to make room for two people’s feet, the front-end spring/damper units were transverse rather than longitudinal. With titanium uprights and magnesium wheels, not to mention all-metal ball joints, it was no wonder the F50 steered with such precision. The F50 was to be much rarer than Ferrari’s previous flagship hyper car, the F40: the company decreed that only 349 would be built, compared with 1311 F40s
Ferrari F50 Ferrari F50
Car review on FERRARI F50

When the time came for Ferrari engineers to build a new flagship in the mid-1990s, the brief was simple and uncompromising: take our 1990 Formula 1 racer (the 641/2) and transform it into a street-legal 200 mph (322kph) road car. Enter, in March 1995, the F50, the spiritual successor to the F40 and certainly the most potent road car yet made by Ferrari.

Clothed in a flat-bottomed Pininfarina body that recalled Ferrari’s sports racers of the early 70s, it was easily the wildest road car Ferrari had ever built. With such headline-making performance figures, pundits made immediate comparisons with McLaren’s stunning Fl. It was understandable but in reality these were two very different cars: where the F1’s designers pursued refinement and build quality as well as ultimate performance, the F50 – a shade slower than the bigger-engine and lighter McLaren – was more of a raw sports car created to give its owner Formula 1 sensations on the road.

The F50 nevertheless proved a surprisingly easy car to drive with a superb six-speed gearbox, reasonable ride (despite the rock-hard computerized damping and massive 335/30 ZR 18 tires) and a user-friendly engine. Then there was the small matter of price: at £330,000 ($555,000) the F50 was hardly cheap but still about half the cost of the British McLaren.

Boasting 521 bhp from its Formula 1-derived five-valves-per-cylinder V-twelve engine, the F50 could do 64 mph (103 kph) in first, 112 mph (180 kph) in second, 124 mph (194 kph) in third, 138mpli (222 kph) in fourth, 160 mph (275 kph) in fifth and 202 mph (325 kph) in sixth. The handling was more forgiving than the F40 despite the extra speed, with superb non-assisted steering giving little kick-back but masterly precision.

Details

Updated on October 1, 2016 at 12:00 am
  • Year Built: 1997

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